Casebook Blog

Bridging the Gap Between Practice and Technology in Human Services

Written by: Scooter Ward, Account Executive, Casebook PBC

At the center of any case in human services is a person receiving care. Every action is either directed towards or radiates from that individual. For over a decade, the conversation in human services has been about person-centric care, and how if we practice a “whole person” model it can reap positive benefits, not just for that individual, but also those around the person as well. 

Recently, that conversation has crossed the chasm into human services technology and the need for person-centric design, genograms, and family constellations. All of this is meant to facilitate a level of care that addresses the needs of our most vulnerable citizens in a way that Is flexible, personalized, and directed. Today’s human services solutions need to be purpose-built to support a foundation of care, all while being flexible enough to adjust to the everyday changes that progressive practice models require.  

Casebook Platform technology solutions are created as a response to frustration among human services professionals and leaders who have struggled with information systems that do not create an entire person story. As a result, Casebook PBC continues to develop configurable, intuitive, and easy to maintain software in close partnership with human services practitioners.  

Our solutions evolve with policy and practice changes in human services to provide the best-in-class experience. We originally began with our Child Welfare solution, built on our ever-evolving Casebook Platform, and we’ve recently released our new Provider Management solution. Casebook solutions are comprised of our configurable suite of business applications that can be extended or purposely combined to fit the needs of the different agency or organizational needs. What does not change is the model of person centricity. We build technology solutions with a foundational understanding that it is essential to remember the human element of human services technology.

Menu